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Armand Comire

The Costello Certificate of Perseverance

 

  Armand deployed to Vietnam and like most who went, he lost many good friends. He was severely wounded by mortar rounds. With a sucking chest wound, after all became quiet he did his very best to check on his two rifle buddies, while passing out multiple times in the attempts. The last time he became unconscious he was certain he was dead. He came to on a stretcher being carried to a Medi-Vac. One of the soldiers carrying the stretcher lost his grip and out rolled Armand. He did not scream in pain or cry, instead he just stared off with the most serious look and says " you should have seen your face" then laughs. Just an example of how incredibly strong willed Armand truly  is, with all that pain still managed to make light of an extremely frightening and tense situation.  

 After Armand completely healed he decided to join the Connecticut state police, despite the challenges of losing vision of one of his eyes and only having use of half of one lung.

  He was able to fully retire and now spends time with friends and family, sharing stories over an open fire. We greatly appreciate your bravery and scarifies you have made for this country. 

Thank you for your service Armand Comire.

Appreciation Certificates

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George Carlucci

George Joined the navy right after high school, to become a Corps Man. He served in Vietnam in '66 and '67 where he medically served Marines during multiple battles and fire fights. George was injured and had to be med-vacked stateside. Even after the injury George refused to give up, he received a degree and joined the Army National Guard as a medical officer. After retiring George worked within the VA system where he treated and helped vets from every War era within the 20th century. After suffering the lose of his wife due to cancer, no one would have blamed George for giving up, but he choose to use the pain inside as motivation to continue to helps others. Even today George donates his time to help The Vet2VetGroup with our mission. We appreciate all you have scarified and all you to continue to do to help your fellow veterans. 

Thank you for your service George Carlucci.

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Philip Harris

Philip was an airman for 4 years and he has worked as a firefighter and first responder for almost 20 years and since then has been a volunteer for more than25 years. Although Philip has not suffered and physical injuries he has taken home many mentally disturbing images from car accidents to fully engulfed homes and buildings. The most devastating is seeing death itself in the many victims of fires, specifically the children. All the sorrows are not without rewarded from the countless smiles of individuals and families alike. Philip continues to battle alcoholism, but has been sober for nearly 2 decades. 

Thank you Philip Harris for your dedication and bravery to your job, we honor you as our First Responder of 2019

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Bill Fuller

Bill Fuller was faced with his own conscience vs. the American bureaucracy. As a NCO in Vietnam Bill came across one of his soldiers completely naked with his rifle loaded and ready for use. Bill brought the situation up to his superiors as any of us would. The soldier was taken out of their u nit. Many weeks later Bill found out that the soldier had been reassigned to another u nit and put in an armed guard duty and had taken his own life. Feeling completely defeated and betrayed Bill went AWOL for almost a year before turning himself in. He was discharged with less than honorable conditions, despite his being awarded 3 Bronze Stars. Ever since then Bill has suffered from PTSD. For many years he had difficulty keeping a job, but never gave in, and was able to work and retire at UPS, Bill at this point tells his story not as a failure, more like a learning point in his life. He tries to use his own mistakes to teach others the importance of owning each and every choice we make. 

We Thank You for your service Bill fuller.

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Stephen Kohler

Stephen Kohler is and Army Officer, he was deployed in the '90's during both Desert Storm and Desert Shield as a communication officer. While serving our great nation he was awarded the bronze star on tow separate occasions.While deployed Stephen suffered from saran gas poisoning multiple times, TBI, and PTSD . Once state side he has battle a gruesome divorce and many relocations before settling back in the north country where he strives to be the best man for his wife, friends and fellow veterans. Stephen speaks from the heart when he says " I have come to accept my disability as part of giving myself in service to the country and living with aftermath."

We greatly appreciate the sacrifices you have made for our country. 

 Thank You for our Service Stephen Kohler.


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Jeff Ingalls

Jeff is a prime example of military sacrifice even when not in war. Jeff Ingalls joined the Navy in the 1970's. He trained as a SeaBee Master Diver in advanced underwater construction technician and a salvage construction demolition. He also served as an instructor at Blast school and operated advanced equipment. In 1985 Jeff and his dive team were on an airplane that was hi-jacked. Everyone was taken as hostages by the terrorist group Hezbollah. Jeff was eventually released and brought back stateside. Just because he didn't suffer significant Physical wounds does not mean he left without scars. Jeff suffers from PTSD and certain social anxiety. All this and he has continued to keep on marching forward, even despite his mother's failing mental health, Jeff puts one foot in front of the other by doing his best to be a good company owner,boss,great husband and an excellent son. He goes to group meetings and tries his best to learn from all the other veterans' experiences. 

We admire your bravery and Thank you for your service Jeff Ingalls.

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Patrick Keating

Patrick was in the Vietnam in the Navy as part of the Brown Water Navy which went up and down the rivers and water ways directly in country as a security force. While deployed he engaged in many fire fights and suffered from Agent Orange Poisoning. When he came home and for many years since he hah suffered from PTSD. Over the years he has worked as his local post office and UP. He and hi lovely wife have recently moved to the little ton area and has attending individual and group counseling in order to better himself. While getting paperwork together for the VA he took a bold step and asked his children to write statements on his behalf knowing they were not going to paint a beautiful picture of him as a father or husband. Here he is today trying so hard to work on himself instead of blaming the world or becoming a statistic.

We thank you for your Service Patick Keating